traffic safety

Improving Traffic and Pedestrian Safety

Many of you have written or spoken to me about traffic and pedestrian safety issues in each and every corner of the ward.

While there are no quick fixes, four years of hard work have taught me that broad community engagement is integral to each and every effort to improve safety on our streets and sidewalks.

The key is bringing neighbourhoods together around the same table to identify problems and brainstorm solutions. Effective, long term solutions are built on broad, neighbourhood-wide consensus.

There’s a wide range of options and tools available to neighbourhoods to improve safety – improved signage, new or refreshed pavement markings, all way stops and flashing beacons, to name a few – and city staff can walk you through the ins and outs of each approach.

Since the beginning of the term, I’ve spearheaded more nearly 50 motions at North York Community Council to address traffic and pedestrian safety issues. Each and every motion began with a community meeting and local engagement.

If you have a traffic or pedestrian safety issue in your neighbourhood, please don’t hesitate to bring it to my attention by email at Councillor_Robinson@toronto.ca or by phone at (416) 395-6408.

City rolls out real-time travel time info on highways

The roll out of the city’s congestion management plan continues!

The city just launched a pilot project where real-time travel information will be displayed on electronic signs on our highways and arterial roads to provide motorists with better information as they travel around the city.

The 11 signs, located on the Gardiner, DVP and Lake Shore Boulevard, will display the travel time to various points along these routes. Seven more signs will be installed as part of the project this year.

This project is part of the city’s five-year plan to tackle congestion and improve traffic flow, which also includes signal retiming and synchronization as well as curb lane management and the installation of traffic cameras to improve real time traffic management.

Progress on Congestion and Gridlock

Earlier this month, I took the reins of my first Public Works and Infrastructure Committee meeting as Chair.

Congestion and girdlock remain my number one priority and it was front and centre on Public Works’ agenda.

The Committee voted to move forward with a pilot project to reduce congestion by speeding up city-led construction projects. Among other things, the pilot will explore extending work hours, shifting to overnight work and using incentive-based contracts.

The Committee also took an advanced look at some of the congestion-cutting initiatives lined up for 2015, including the roll-out of 80 additional arterial cameras, a pilot of the latest “smart signal” technology and signal synchronizations on 12 major corridors.

I spearheaded two motions to help get the city moving.

The first asks for a report on using portable cameras at construction sites, allowing us to monitor and respond to construction-related gridlock in real time.

The second asks for a report on how we can better share traffic-related information between the city’s key players, like the TTC and the Transportation Services Division. I also asked city staff to explore using “Big Data” to understand, evaluate and respond to congestion.

You can see copies of my motions here and here. You can also read up on the city’s plan to speed up public-sector construction projects here.