cycle tracks

Staying Safe on the Roads

Every fall and winter there is an increase in the number of pedestrian and cyclist collisions on city roads due to reduced daylight hours.

It’s key that drivers, pedestrians and cyclists become more aware of other users as they travel on our streets throughout these seasons.

One of the best ways to ensure safety is to stay focused on what you’re doing – whether you’re driving, cycling or crossing an intersection by foot. Don’t talk or text on your phone. Be aware of your surroundings.

Here are some other tips from the city’s “Stay Alert – Stay Safe” safety education campaign:

Drivers

  • Always yield to pedestrians at crosswalks.
  • Note that pedestrians in dark clothing can be difficult to spot during the fall and winter months.
  • Take extra caution at nighttime and during wet or wintery weather conditions.

Pedestrians

  • Cross streets at traffic signals, intersections and crosswalks.
  • Always look carefully before crossing and make sure all vehicles are stopped.
  • Wear bright clothing or clothing with reflective materials if possible, especially at night. Drivers often have a difficult time seeing pedestrians in dark clothes.

Cyclists

  • Make sure you have both front and back lights for your bike and turn them on when riding at night, dusk or dawn.
  • Wear clothing and other cycling accessories with reflective materials.

Extension of the Richmond-Adelaide Cycle Tracks

Opening the extended cycle track on Richmond with Jared Kolb, Executive Director of Cycle Toronto, Alan Heisey, Vice-Chair of the TTC, Stephen Buckley, General Manager of Transportation Services, and Jacquelyn Haywood Gulati, Manager of Cycling Infrastructure and Programs.

Opening the extended cycle track on Richmond with Jared Kolb, Executive Director of Cycle Toronto, Alan Heisey, Vice-Chair of the TTC, Stephen Buckley, General Manager of Transportation Services, and Jacquelyn Haywood Gulati, Manager of Cycling Infrastructure and Programs.

In 2014, the city installed separated bike lanes (cycle tracks) on Richmond Street and Adelaide Street from Bathurst to York/Simcoe. This pilot project assessed the feasibility of separated bike lanes on these corridors.

In June 2015, the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee received a report on the pilot. Early results are promising! Cycling volumes on Adelaide have tripled while those on Richmond have more than doubled. Even better, there’s been no negative impact on congestion.

You can read highlights from the evaluation report here.

As chair of the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee, I moved a motion to extend the cycle track pilot on Richmond and Adelaide east to Parliament.

The Richmond extension is now complete, and work on Adelaide is underway and will be completed later this fall.

The 10-Year Cycling Network Plan

The City of Toronto is developing a new 10-year plan to enhance the city’s cycling network. This plan will add new routes and improve existing routes, all with the goal of making Toronto more connected and safer for cyclists while easing congestion.

The plan is in its second phase of public consultations. You can participate by offering your feedback on the draft cycle network map!

You can also get involved in the new 10-year plan by recording your cycling trips in the Toronto Cycling App, a free smartphone app for Android and iPhone.

Chair, Public Works & Infrastructure Committee

Touring our new and improved Traffic Operations Centre with the General Manager of Transportation Services Stephen Buckley

Touring our new and improved Traffic Operations Centre with the General Manager of Transportation Services Stephen Buckley

I’m honoured to serve as Chair of the Public Works & Infrastructure Committee, one of the city’s seven Standing Committees.

I asked for a substantive portfolio and Public Works is it

With a budget of more than $2 billion, Public Works oversees four of the city’s key divisions – Transportation Services, Toronto Water, Solid Waste Management and Engineering & Construction Services. It’s responsible for an incredibly diverse array of issues: congestion, gridlock, drinking water, storm sewers, roads, bridges, sidewalks, highways, speed limits, bike lanes, bike safety, waste collection, recycling and street furniture, to name a few!

Traffic, gridlock and congestion were front and centre during the campaign – in Ward 25 and across the city – and, as I told the Toronto Sun, “it’s my number one priority.”

Last week, I sat down with Stephen Buckley, the General Manager of Transportation Services, to discuss what we can do right now to improve congestion and to tour our new and improved Traffic Operations Centre.

Briefings with other key staff and divisional leads are already scheduled – it’s a big job and I can’t wait to get to work!