residential infill

Residential Infill Inspection Information

Based on feedback I received from residents, I moved several motions directing the city to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

In response, City staff developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the City deals with problem properties.

As part of this strategy, Toronto Building has created an infill development website with information on how to be a good neighbour during the construction process and how the city effectively responds to and addresses complaints about construction sites.

Furthermore, if you have concerns about a residential infill development in your neighbourhood, you are now able to find the contact information of the City’s building inspector online here.

For more information on the City’s Residential Infill Development Strategy, please visit www.toronto.ca/infill.

Improving Residential Infill Construction Sites

In my first term, based on feedback from residents, I moved several motions urging the city to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

 

In response, last year city staff developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the city deals with problem properties.

Since the approval of this strategy, we’ve made significant headway in encouraging good construction practices and ensuring proper enforcement, including:

  • A new introductory inspection to clarify the city’s expectations with the builder
  • A policy for expanding the use of tickets as an enforcement tool
  • Enhanced training for building inspectors

Toronto Building is also in the midst of developing requirements for a new and improved notice that permit holders will be required to post on site.

Be sure to check out toronto.ca/infill, which provides resources for residents, including a Good Neighbour Guide outlining requirements, best practices and communication tips to help everyone involved move smoothly through the project.

Update on Improvements to Residential Infill Construction

In my first term, based on what I was hearing from residents, I moved several motions urging the city to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

In response, last year city staff developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the city deals with problem properties.

Since the approval of this strategy, we’ve made significant headway in encouraging good construction practices and ensuring proper enforcement , including:

  • A new introductory inspection to clarify the city’s expectations with the builder
  • A policy for expanding the use of tickets as an enforcement tool
  • Enhanced training for building inspectors

Toronto Building is also in the midst of developing requirements for a new and improved notice that permit holders will be required to post on site.

Be sure to check out toronto.ca/infill, which provides great resources for residents, including a Good Neighbour Guide outlining requirements, best practices and communication tips to help everyone involved move smoothly through the project.

Unfinished Residential Construction Sites

Residential infill construction activity in Toronto has more than doubled since 2010 – and 33% of this construction is happening in Ward 25 and two neighbouring Wards.

Over the years, based on your feedback and frustrations with residential infill construction, I’ve moved multiple motions to improve the city’s response to this issue.

While the city has been making headway on addressing problem sites, one outstanding issue remains: partially completed or abandoned construction projects. These unmonitored, unfinished sites are disruptive and unsightly for local residents and pose safety hazards.

This October, I moved a motion at the Planning and Growth Management Committee directing staff to report back on a strategy to effectively deal with unfinished and abandoned residential infill construction sites. I’ve asked staff to consider a variety of options, including time limits and the addition of specific conditions to the issuance of building permits.

As residential infill construction activity continues to soar in our community, we need to better manages sites that lay incomplete or deserted – it’s key to maintaining the safety, integrity and aesthetic of our local neighbourhoods.

Progress on Residential Infill Construction

Residential infill construction activity in Toronto has more than doubled between 2010 and 2015 – and 33% of this construction is happening in Ward 25 and the two neighbouring Wards.

Last term, I moved several motions at the Planning & Growth Management Committee – directly based on what I was hearing from local residents – to improve and streamline the city’s response to problem residential infill construction sites.

In response to my recommendations, city staff have designed an interdivisional strategy to minimize and mitigate the negative impacts of residential infill construction activity.

The strategy is three-pronged and involves:

  • Improvements to the complaint management system to ensure complaints are dealt with more effectively, including enhanced coordination between city divisions;
  • Improvements to communication with residents, including the creation of a city website with key information, the development of a best practices guide for builders and required construction signage on-site; and,
  • Development of good construction practices, including improved education, more effective enforcement, a ticketing pilot project and enhanced building inspector knowledge

It’s high time that contractors start playing by the rules and that residents have easy access to information that will help them better navigate what’s happening in their neighbourhoods.

Staff’s recommendations also provide timelines for the roll out of each recommendation – in my mind, this improves transparency and holds the city accountable.

You can read staff’s full report by clicking here.

In early 2017, Municipal Licensing & Standards will provide recommendations on dust control measures, including the enactment of a bylaw regulating dust from construction activities.

Intensification in the Yonge & Eglinton Community

Toronto is experiencing unprecedented growth. While many neighbourhoods are feeling the pinch, few are experiencing levels of growth and change like the Yonge-Eglinton area. This growth has direct impacts on our built form and infrastructure – from transit to schools to stormwater management.

That’s why, in July 2015, I asked the Chief Planner to report on planning tools that can be used to help manage intensification pressure in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood.

The goal of the study, the Yonge and Eglinton Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review, is to develop an evidence-based planning approach that can better inform the development review process and policy-making moving forward.

From my perspective, any and all growth needs to be effectively managed to ensure the continued liveability of our community. These planning tools will guide the vision, form and fit of future developments with a focus on the context-specific character of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood.

Building on the recently City Council-approved Midtown in Focus, a plan focusing on public realm improvements to streets, buildings and open spaces, the Yonge and Eglinton Review is really four plans in one. Using recent growth analyses, the Review examines built form, cultural heritage, community infrastructure and transportation and municipal services.

A key component of the review involves a detailed analysis of the performance and capacity of city infrastructure, including transportation networks, water, wastewater and energy. The final report will outline what infrastructural improvements would be needed based on projected growth estimates.

Expected in Spring 2016, the report will enhance the development review process by providing hard data on the multiple impacts of intensification in Yonge-Eglinton.

The bottom line is that we want to maintain the unique feel of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood and the characteristics that make it a vibrant community.

For updates on the Yonge and Eglinton Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review, click here.

Intensification and Development Pressure in Yonge-Eglinton

Intensification is a major issue across Ward 25. The Yonge-Eglinton area in particular is facing very significant development pressure.

That’s why I moved a motion earlier this year at City Council directing the Chief Planner to report on planning tools that can be used to help manage the growth and intensification pressure in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood. Click here to read my motion.

I also directed staff to accelerate the built form study of the Yonge-Eglinton area. The goal of this study is to develop up-to-date policies to guide growth and maintain the neighbourhood’s quality of life. The study builds on the Midtown in Focus plan, a City Council approved strategy to improve parks, open spaces and streets.

To stay up-to-date about the master plan for the Yonge-Eglinton area, click here.

Increasing Fees in Construction Contracts

I chaired the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee in summer 2015 where we approved a pilot to apply acceleration and delay costs in construction contracts.

The goal is to reduce congestion by speeding up construction on city roads, particularly high-traffic corridors.

The pilot has a two-pronged approach:

  • Financial penalties for construction delays
  • An innovative tendering process that considers both overall cost and completion time

Other jurisdictions, including Ottawa and York Region, have had success in applying acceleration and delay costs to high-priority construction projects.

City staff will report back on the pilot to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee in 2017.

Click here for more information.

Problem Residential Infill Construction Sites

Residential infill construction can be a major disruption, especially for immediate neighbours and nearby homes.Late last year, I moved a motion asking for a comprehensive report on how the city can improve its response to problem construction sites.

Among other things, I asked city staff to consider:

  • The feasibility of identifying a single city staff lead to liaise with neighbours and coordinate an interdivisional response;
  • Improved and effective enforcement measures to ensure compliance with site and safety by-laws;
  • The feasibility of posting key information on hoarding boards, like noise restrictions and parking permissions; and,
  • Developing a plan to effectively deal with buildings that are not built according to plan.

Earlier this summer, city staff brought a work plan to the Planning and Growth Management Committee. The work plan sets out an extensive review of best practices, research and issue identification as well as ratepayer and industry consultation.You can find the work plan here. A final report is expected in fall 2015.

Construction Site Nuisances – Improving Our Response

As I wrote in my last eNewsletter, I brought a motion forward to last month’s Planning and Growth Management Committee asking the city to improve its response to problem residential infill construction.

Living near a construction site can be disruptive, to say the least, and I’m pleased to report that the Committee passed my motion.

Based on Ward 25’s experience, my motion directs the Chief Planner to report on:

  • Posting key information on site, like noise restrictions and parking permissions;
  • Effective enforcement measures to ensure compliance with all applicable regulations;
  • Streamlining the city’s response by identifying a single lead to liaise with the neighbourhood and coordinate an interdivisional response; and,
  • Measures to deal with buildings that are not built according to approved plans and drawings.

Please see the full text of my motion here.

 

Residential Infill Construction – Improving Our Response

Residential infill construction can be a major disruption, especially for immediate neighbours and nearby homes.

In my experience, the problems can often be complex and multifaceted, from improper shoring and fencing to noise and site safety issues to impassable streets and sidewalks.

That’s why I’ve brought a motion forward to June’s Planning and Growth Management Committee meeting asking city staff to improve how the city responds to problem residential infill construction sites.

Based on Ward 25’s feedback and experience over the past term, my motion directs the city’s Chief Building Official to examine, among other things:

  • The feasibility of identifying a single city staff lead to liaise with neighbours and coordinate an interdivisional response;
  • Improved and effective enforcement measures to ensure compliance with site and safety by-laws;
  • The feasibility of posting key information on hoarding boards, like noise restrictions and parking permissions; and,
  • Develop a plan to effectively deal with buildings that are not built according to plan.

You can see my full motion here and check my next newsletter for a report on the outcome of the Committee meeting!