Residential Infill

Residential Infill Inspection Information

Based on feedback I received from residents, I moved several motions directing the city to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

In response, City staff developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the City deals with problem properties.

As part of this strategy, Toronto Building has created an infill development website with information on how to be a good neighbour during the construction process and how the city effectively responds to and addresses complaints about construction sites.

Furthermore, if you have concerns about a residential infill development in your neighbourhood, you are now able to find the contact information of the City’s building inspector online here.

For more information on the City’s Residential Infill Development Strategy, please visit www.toronto.ca/infill.

Intensification & the OMB in Yonge-Eglinton

The Yonge and Eglinton neighbourhood is experiencing some of the most extreme intensification in the entire city – by 2030, between 24,000 and 28,000 new residents are expected to live in the area.

The Ontario Municipal Board has continued to approve development after development without considering whether there is the infrastructure capacity to handle such a huge increase of development and the impacts to the existing community.

The OMB-approved 35-storey building at 18-30 Erskine Avenue – right next to John Fisher Junior Public School – is the ultimate example of this irresponsible and narrow-focused provincial planning process. While I’m encouraged by the province’s recently announced reforms to the OMB, they’re unfortunately too late for already approved developments like the one at 18-30 Erskine and the overdevelopment of Yonge-Eglinton more generally.

In the meantime, the city is developing a new planning framework – called Midtown in Focus – to improve parks, open space and streetscape in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood. In 2015, I moved to expand the scope of Midtown in Focus to include a review of the performance and capacity of city infrastructure, including transit, transportation networks, community services, water and energy.

Midtown in Focus will begin to come to fruition later this year when city staff bring forward draft recommendations for the updated Yonge Eglinton Secondary Plan. The new Secondary Plan is expected to be completed in mid-2018.

Improving Residential Infill Construction Sites

In my first term, based on feedback from residents, I moved several motions urging the city to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

 

In response, last year city staff developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the city deals with problem properties.

Since the approval of this strategy, we’ve made significant headway in encouraging good construction practices and ensuring proper enforcement, including:

  • A new introductory inspection to clarify the city’s expectations with the builder
  • A policy for expanding the use of tickets as an enforcement tool
  • Enhanced training for building inspectors

Toronto Building is also in the midst of developing requirements for a new and improved notice that permit holders will be required to post on site.

Be sure to check out toronto.ca/infill, which provides resources for residents, including a Good Neighbour Guide outlining requirements, best practices and communication tips to help everyone involved move smoothly through the project.

Local Appeal Body Update

Since I became your local Councillor in 2010, I’ve fought to transform our city’s local planning processes to make them more responsive to the needs and concerns of our city’s local neighbourhoods.

Over the years, there have been significant obstacles in getting the city to establish its own Local Appeal Body, an independent decision-making body that will replace the Ontario Municipal Board in hearing appeals of Committee of Adjustment decisions on minor variance and consent applications.

But after years of hard work, Toronto’s Local Appeal Body (TLAB) is finally up and running at 40 Orchard View Boulevard, in the heart of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood!

To learn more about the TLAB, including the hearing schedule and how to appeal a Committee of Adjustment decision, please click here.

Update on Improvements to Residential Infill Construction

In my first term, based on what I was hearing from residents, I moved several motions urging the city to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

In response, last year city staff developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the city deals with problem properties.

Since the approval of this strategy, we’ve made significant headway in encouraging good construction practices and ensuring proper enforcement , including:

  • A new introductory inspection to clarify the city’s expectations with the builder
  • A policy for expanding the use of tickets as an enforcement tool
  • Enhanced training for building inspectors

Toronto Building is also in the midst of developing requirements for a new and improved notice that permit holders will be required to post on site.

Be sure to check out toronto.ca/infill, which provides great resources for residents, including a Good Neighbour Guide outlining requirements, best practices and communication tips to help everyone involved move smoothly through the project.

Improvements to the Committee of Adjustment

As you may know, in my first term I moved several successful motions requesting significant improvements to the Committee of Adjustment (CoA) in order to strengthen transparency and accountability.

I’m please to let you know that City Planning is finally moving ahead with a number of these improvements.

Earlier this year, city staff implemented my recommendation to record CoA hearings. In the coming months, they’ll also be mobilizing technology in other ways to reduce costs and waste.

For example, the newly launched eServices portal requires digital submission of CoA applications – this means that information and decisions relating to active applications will be easily available online at the Application Information Centre on the city’s website.

City Planning has also prepared a CoA brochure that will help residents navigate the processes and procedures of the Committee and more effectively engage in hearings.

Moving forward, city staff will be conducting a full review of CoA processes in each district of Toronto to ensure a more consistent practice across the entire city.

Unfinished Residential Construction Sites

Residential infill construction activity in Toronto has more than doubled since 2010 – and 33% of this construction is happening in Ward 25 and two neighbouring Wards.

Over the years, based on your feedback and frustrations with residential infill construction, I’ve moved multiple motions to improve the city’s response to this issue.

While the city has been making headway on addressing problem sites, one outstanding issue remains: partially completed or abandoned construction projects. These unmonitored, unfinished sites are disruptive and unsightly for local residents and pose safety hazards.

This October, I moved a motion at the Planning and Growth Management Committee directing staff to report back on a strategy to effectively deal with unfinished and abandoned residential infill construction sites. I’ve asked staff to consider a variety of options, including time limits and the addition of specific conditions to the issuance of building permits.

As residential infill construction activity continues to soar in our community, we need to better manages sites that lay incomplete or deserted – it’s key to maintaining the safety, integrity and aesthetic of our local neighbourhoods.

Ontario Municipal Board Review

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) has had a significant impact on Ward 25 – from Yonge and Eglinton to Bayview Avenue and Don Mills, our neighbourhoods are under intense pressure because of the OMB.

The OMB is a provincially appointed, quasi-judicial administrative tribunal that hears planning appeals from the municipal level. When an application is appealed to the OMB, it’s the OMB – not the City of Toronto – that decides whether to approve the application.

The OMB Members that preside over cases are often not from Toronto and do not have the intimate knowledge and local context of our neighbourhoods that the city’s planning departments and local representatives have.

Additionally, while many jurisdictions have planning appeal bodies, none have the same power and broad rights that the OMB does. The OMB has more extensive influence over local planning-related matters than any other provincial board in Canada.

Since I became your local Councillor, nearly every major development in Ward 25 has been appealed to the OMB. This has resulted in over 3,800 residential units and 330 storeys being decided by the province, not the city.

I’ve voted four times with City Council to remove Toronto from the jurisdiction of the OMB. Although the province has not yet acted on releasing Toronto from the OMB’s grasp, they’ve launched a review of the Board’s scope and effectiveness.

You can read more about the review here.

In particular, the province is focusing on five areas:

  • The OMB’s jurisdiction and powers;
  • Citizen participation and local perspective;
  • Clear and predictable decision-making;
  • Modern procedures and faster decisions; and,
  • Alternative dispute resolution and fewer hearings.

I strongly encourage you to participate in the review and share your feedback on the OMB with the province. There are several ways to get involved:

  • Submit or upload your comments using an online web-form
  • Email OMBReview@ontario.ca
  • Call 1-855-776-8011
  • Mail a submission to: Ontario Municipal Board Review, Ministry of Municipal Affairs, Provincial Planning Policy Branch, 777 Bay Street (13th Floor), Toronto, M5G 2E5

The deadline for providing feedback is December 19, 2016.

I also encourage you to attend the province’s OMB Town Hall in Toronto on November 15 at 6:00 p.m. at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. To RSVP, please click here.

Progress on Residential Infill Construction

Residential infill construction activity in Toronto has more than doubled between 2010 and 2015 – and 33% of this construction is happening in Ward 25 and the two neighbouring Wards.

Last term, I moved several motions at the Planning & Growth Management Committee – directly based on what I was hearing from local residents – to improve and streamline the city’s response to problem residential infill construction sites.

In response to my recommendations, city staff have designed an interdivisional strategy to minimize and mitigate the negative impacts of residential infill construction activity.

The strategy is three-pronged and involves:

  • Improvements to the complaint management system to ensure complaints are dealt with more effectively, including enhanced coordination between city divisions;
  • Improvements to communication with residents, including the creation of a city website with key information, the development of a best practices guide for builders and required construction signage on-site; and,
  • Development of good construction practices, including improved education, more effective enforcement, a ticketing pilot project and enhanced building inspector knowledge

It’s high time that contractors start playing by the rules and that residents have easy access to information that will help them better navigate what’s happening in their neighbourhoods.

Staff’s recommendations also provide timelines for the roll out of each recommendation – in my mind, this improves transparency and holds the city accountable.

You can read staff’s full report by clicking here.

In early 2017, Municipal Licensing & Standards will provide recommendations on dust control measures, including the enactment of a bylaw regulating dust from construction activities.

Improving Transparency and Accountability at the Committee of Adjustment

Improvements to the Committee of Adjustment are on the way!

Back in June 2014, I moved a successful motion requesting city staff to bring forward a report with recommendations to improve the Committee of Adjustment. In particular, I asked for:

  • Improvements to the notice process, including the manner and form of public notices as well as extending the distribution area and timeline;
  • Training and professional development for Committee of Adjustment panel members;
  • The audio-visual or audio recording of Committee of Adjustment panels; and,
  • A public participation strategy to ensure the public is well-informed about the process and has the tools to effectively engage in Committee of Adjustment hearings.

For the full text of my motion, click here.

I’m pleased to announce that, at this month’s Planning and Growth Management Committee, city staff brought forward a report recommending the purchase and installation of a device that would allow for the full audio-visual recording of Committee of Adjustment meetings.

Click here to read the report.

Audio-visual recordings of Committee of Adjustment panels will improve the transparency of the process by keeping a record of the meetings.

The device will be installed at City Hall in January 2016.

While there is a significant amount of work still to be done to overhaul the Committee of Adjustment, I’m heartened to see the realization of one of my long-standing recommendations. I look forward to seeing more improvements to the Committee of Adjustment in the near future.

The Planning and Growth Management Committee also requested a report on the feasibility of live-streaming Committee of Adjustment meetings – this means you could follow the meetings from the comfort of your home.

Be on the lookout for that report in 2016!

Local Appeal Body

As no doubt you’re aware, Toronto is facing incredible intensification pressure. That’s why I’m pleased to announce that the city is getting traction on real and significant planning reform!

In my first term in office, I worked with the former Chair of the Planning and Growth Management Committee to get the establishment of a Local Appeal Body (LAB) off the ground. City Council approved the LAB in July 2014.

The LAB will be an independent decision-making body that will replace the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) in hearing appeals of minor variance and consent applications.

The goal is to give Toronto more control over defining its own neighbourhoods. For example, the city, not the province, will appoint LAB members and set up the appointments process. The LAB will also determine its own rules of practice and procedure.

A report from City Planning about the LAB will be coming to Executive Committee in January 2016.

For more information on the LAB, check out this staff presentation from spring 2014.

Intensification in the Yonge & Eglinton Community

Toronto is experiencing unprecedented growth. While many neighbourhoods are feeling the pinch, few are experiencing levels of growth and change like the Yonge-Eglinton area. This growth has direct impacts on our built form and infrastructure – from transit to schools to stormwater management.

That’s why, in July 2015, I asked the Chief Planner to report on planning tools that can be used to help manage intensification pressure in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood.

The goal of the study, the Yonge and Eglinton Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review, is to develop an evidence-based planning approach that can better inform the development review process and policy-making moving forward.

From my perspective, any and all growth needs to be effectively managed to ensure the continued liveability of our community. These planning tools will guide the vision, form and fit of future developments with a focus on the context-specific character of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood.

Building on the recently City Council-approved Midtown in Focus, a plan focusing on public realm improvements to streets, buildings and open spaces, the Yonge and Eglinton Review is really four plans in one. Using recent growth analyses, the Review examines built form, cultural heritage, community infrastructure and transportation and municipal services.

A key component of the review involves a detailed analysis of the performance and capacity of city infrastructure, including transportation networks, water, wastewater and energy. The final report will outline what infrastructural improvements would be needed based on projected growth estimates.

Expected in Spring 2016, the report will enhance the development review process by providing hard data on the multiple impacts of intensification in Yonge-Eglinton.

The bottom line is that we want to maintain the unique feel of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood and the characteristics that make it a vibrant community.

For updates on the Yonge and Eglinton Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review, click here.

Intensification in the Yonge & Eglinton Community

Toronto is experiencing unprecedented growth. While many neighbourhoods are feeling the pinch, few are experiencing levels of growth and change like the Yonge-Eglinton area. This growth has direct impacts on our built form and infrastructure – from transit to schools to stormwater management.

That’s why, in July 2015, I asked the Chief Planner to report on planning tools that can be used to help manage intensification pressure in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood.

The goal of the study, the Yonge and Eglinton Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review, is to develop an evidence-based planning approach that can better inform the development review process and policy-making moving forward.

From my perspective, any and all growth needs to be effectively managed to ensure the continued liveability of our community. These planning tools will guide the vision, form and fit of future developments with a focus on the context-specific character of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood.

Building on the recently City Council-approved Midtown in Focus, a plan focusing on public realm improvements to streets, buildings and open spaces, the Yonge and Eglinton Review is really four plans in one. Using recent growth analyses, the Review examines built form, cultural heritage, community infrastructure and transportation and municipal services.

A key component of the review involves a detailed analysis of the performance and capacity of city infrastructure, including transportation networks, water, wastewater and energy. The final report will outline what infrastructural improvements would be needed based on projected growth estimates.

Expected in Spring 2016, the report will enhance the development review process by providing hard data on the multiple impacts of intensification in Yonge-Eglinton.

The bottom line is that we want to maintain the unique feel of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood and the characteristics that make it a vibrant community.

For updates on the Yonge and Eglinton Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review, click here.

Increasing Fees in Construction Contracts

I chaired the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee in summer 2015 where we approved a pilot to apply acceleration and delay costs in construction contracts.

The goal is to reduce congestion by speeding up construction on city roads, particularly high-traffic corridors.

The pilot has a two-pronged approach:

  • Financial penalties for construction delays
  • An innovative tendering process that considers both overall cost and completion time

Other jurisdictions, including Ottawa and York Region, have had success in applying acceleration and delay costs to high-priority construction projects.

City staff will report back on the pilot to the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee in 2017.

Click here for more information.

Problem Residential Infill Construction Sites

Residential infill construction can be a major disruption, especially for immediate neighbours and nearby homes.Late last year, I moved a motion asking for a comprehensive report on how the city can improve its response to problem construction sites.

Among other things, I asked city staff to consider:

  • The feasibility of identifying a single city staff lead to liaise with neighbours and coordinate an interdivisional response;
  • Improved and effective enforcement measures to ensure compliance with site and safety by-laws;
  • The feasibility of posting key information on hoarding boards, like noise restrictions and parking permissions; and,
  • Developing a plan to effectively deal with buildings that are not built according to plan.

Earlier this summer, city staff brought a work plan to the Planning and Growth Management Committee. The work plan sets out an extensive review of best practices, research and issue identification as well as ratepayer and industry consultation.You can find the work plan here. A final report is expected in fall 2015.

Construction Coordination Update

We’re at the tail end of an unprecedented construction season.

The increased construction activity signals much needed and long overdue investment in our city’s basic infrastructure but also brings congestion and disruption.

That’s why the city is redoubling its construction coordination efforts.

I recently met with the Director of the city’s Major Capital Infrastructure Coordination (MCIC) group – the lead on construction coordination.

MCIC’s job is to organize and connect key stakeholders from city divisions (Water, Transportation, TTC), third-party utility and telecommunication companies (Toronto Hydro, Enbridge, Rogers, Bell) as well as private developers, share information and identify opportunities to bundle and streamline work.

MCIC’s role does not end when construction starts. Once shovels are in the ground, MCIC is constantly on the lookout for ways to reduce congestion and disruption, including accelerating or decelerating construction activity or implementing short term signal changes on surrounding streets, among other things.

Of course, there is always room for improvement – I see it day in and day out.

Please let me know if you see an example of poor construction coordination by sending me an email or calling my office. Each and every example can help us improve the city’s response going forward!

Residential Infill Construction – Improving Our Response

Residential infill construction can be a major disruption, especially for immediate neighbours and nearby homes.

In my experience, the problems can often be complex and multifaceted, from improper shoring and fencing to noise and site safety issues to impassable streets and sidewalks.

That’s why I’ve brought a motion forward to June’s Planning and Growth Management Committee meeting asking city staff to improve how the city responds to problem residential infill construction sites.

Based on Ward 25’s feedback and experience over the past term, my motion directs the city’s Chief Building Official to examine, among other things:

  • The feasibility of identifying a single city staff lead to liaise with neighbours and coordinate an interdivisional response;
  • Improved and effective enforcement measures to ensure compliance with site and safety by-laws;
  • The feasibility of posting key information on hoarding boards, like noise restrictions and parking permissions; and,
  • Develop a plan to effectively deal with buildings that are not built according to plan.

You can see my full motion here and check my next newsletter for a report on the outcome of the Committee meeting!

Planning Reform – Towards a Functional Committee of Adjustment

The city’s move towards a local appeal body is an opportunity to take a new approach to minor variance applications at the Committee of Adjustment.

That’s why I’ve put a significant motion on the Planning and Growth Management Committee’s June agenda.

My motion asks the city’s Chief Planner to bring forward a report in the first quarter of 2015 on key recommendations to improve how the Committee of Adjustment functions in the minor variance context.

The motion is based on your feedback over the past term, and it specifically requests the Chief Planner to report on:

  • Improvements to the notice process, including the manner and form of public notices as well as extending the distribution area and timeline;
  • Training and professional development for Committee of Adjustment panel members;
  • The audio-visual or audio recording of Committee of Adjustment panels; and,
  • A public participation strategy to ensure the public is well informed about the process and has the tools to effectively engage in Committee of Adjustment hearings.

You can check out the full text of my motion here. Keep an eye on my next newsletter for a report on the outcome of the Committee’s June meeting!

Local Appeal Board Consultations

Public consultations are underway on creating a Local Appeal Body (LAB). The LAB would hear appeals from the Committee of Adjustment, replacing the Ontario Municipal Board in the context of minor variance and consent applications.

The North York meeting is on Monday, March 3, 7 p.m. at North York Civic Centre and the central meeting on Monday, March 17, 7 p.m. at Metro Hall.

The public consultations will feed into a long awaited and highly anticipated staff report – one that I have pushed hard for over the course of the term – that is expected to recommend that the city establish a LAB. I encourage you to come out and have your say. Check out www.toronto.ca/localappealbody for more information!

Post City Column: Bayview design study underway

By Jaye Robinson
Post City Magazine — Bayview Edition
January 2014

Bayview Avenue from Lawrence Avenue East to Highway 401 is facing significant intensification and development pressure.

Throughout the fall, I have been working with residents and ratepayer associations as well as senior City of Toronto planning staff, including our chief planner, to develop solutions to protect and preserve Bayview’s unique and distinctive character.

In early November, I held a community meeting to give residents an opportunity to speak directly to city planning staff. A clear majority of the neighbourhood —including Bayview-area residents’ associations — voted to undertake a design guidelines study of Bayview from Lawrence to the 401.

I am pleased to report that immediately after the meeting I moved a successful motion at North York Community Council directing staff to get the study underway.

Design guidelines provide a framework for evaluating development applications and setting out setback, landscaping, privacy and other key design issues. They should also help prevent townhouse creep onto adjoining side streets. A similar study was undertaken for Bayview north of the 401.

Community and neighbourhood consultations will be the focus of the study. We need your input, and I encourage you to get involved when the study gets off the ground next year!

If you would like to receive updates about the study — including public consultation dates — please send me an email at Councillor_Robinson@toronto.ca, or give my office a call at 416-395-6408.