Bill 108

The Province’s LPASC is Closing

Last spring, the Province’s Local Planning Appeal Support Centre (LPASC) was introduced to provide expert advice and legal assistance to residents participating in the new Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) development appeal process. The LPASC was an integral part of the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) reform passed by the Provincial Legislature in 2017.

In February, the Province suddenly announced that they would be permanently closing the LPASC. Effective immediately, the Centre will no longer be accepting new requests from the public.

Like many of you, I was shocked and disappointed by the Province’s decision. At the February meeting of City Council, I supported a motion strongly opposing the closure of the LPASC. In my remarks, I spoke at length about the lack of accessibility and transparency for residents participating in complex and expensive proceedings at the LPAT, formerly known as the OMB.

The appeal process is difficult to navigate and often leaves engaged neighbours feeling like they are in a David and Goliath battle against powerful, well-funded developers. While professional developers can assemble large teams of qualified experts, the costs of participating in LPAT mediation or hearings are often prohibitive for concerned neighbours and associations. I would encourage you to reach out to the Premier and Minister of Municipal Affairs to share your concerns about this decision.

Update on the Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan

As many of you know, I've been a vocal opponent of the out-of-control pace of development in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood. In the absence of a comprehensive and up-to-date Secondary Plan, development in the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood has gone unchecked by the Province for many years.
 
The negative consequences of this rapid intensification include overcrowded transit, constant construction, traffic congestion, lack of sunlight, significant dust, and lack of green space.
 
Last summer, City Council voted to approve the new Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan, Official Plan Amendment (OPA) 405. You can read more about our community's successful efforts to amend the Secondary Plan and reduce the permitted building heights on my website, here.
 
The Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan requires approval by the Minister of Municipal Affairs before officially coming into effect. We've been advised that the Minister has recently extended his time period to make a decision until June 6, 2019.
 
In light of this impending deadline, I met with the Minister of Municipal Affairs immediately to advise him of our collective efforts on this file over the past eight years. While I cannot predict the Minister's ultimate decision with any certainty, he listened closely to my summary of the community's concerns. Specifically, we discussed how the flood of Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) approvals in this neighbourhood has placed an immense amount of pressure on our existing infrastructure.
 
I want to take this opportunity to thank all of the residents of the north-east quadrant of Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood for your support throughout this process.

A Discouraging Update – The LPASC is Closing

In my last newsletter, I provided a brief introduction to the Local Planning Appeal Support Centre (LPASC). The LPASC was introduced to level the playing field for residents participating in the development appeal process.  
 
In February, the Province announced their decision to close the LPASC permanently. Effective immediately, the Centre will no longer be accepting new requests from the public.
 
Like many of you, I was shocked and disappointed by the Province's decision. At the February meeting of City Council, I endorsed the following motion:
 
That City Council advise the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing that the City objects to the closure of the Local Planning Appeal Support Centre.
 
In my remarks to Council, I spoke at length about the lack of accessibility and transparency for residents participating in the complex and expensive development appeal process. The process is difficult to navigate and often leaves engaged neighbours feeling like they are in a David and Goliath battle against powerful, well-funded developers.
 
While professional developers can assemble large teams of qualified experts, the costs of participating in an OMB mediation or hearing are often prohibitive for concerned neighbours and residents' associations.
 
I would encourage you to reach out to the Premier and Minister of Municipal Affairs to share your concerns about this decision.