City Hall

The Transportation Division is Re-Organizing!

This year, the Transportation Services division is undergoing a complete re-organization to streamline the delivery of services, improve efficiency, and eliminate duplication.

Among other improvements, this re-organization has resulted in the creation of a new local transportation unit -- Area Transportation Planning.

Area Transportation Planning's approach will be a significant departure from the current Traffic Operations model, which assesses traffic and pedestrian safety concerns on an issue-by-issue basis. Instead, Area Transportation Planning will evaluate broader neighbourhood traffic patterns and approach solutions more holistically.

I'm looking forward to working with the Area Transportation Planning unit and the local community to improve road safety in our Ward 15 neighbourhoods.

A Missed Opportunity for Cost Savings – Open Tendering in Toronto

With much of the City's attention focused on the Raptors' NBA Championship, a very important vote flew under the radar at the June meeting of City Council.

City Council had a unique opportunity to exempt Toronto from the nine, exclusive collective agreements that have dominated our Industrial (ICI) sector for decades. The Province's Bill 66 included a clause permitting closed-tendering cities to become "non-construction employers," meaning that they could accept bids from any qualified contractors, as opposed to only awarding contracts to contractors using the nine designated trade union subcontractors.

Open tendering would encourage competition in the City's procurement process. With a $2.2 billion State of Good Repair backlog, Toronto cannot afford to miss out on this opportunity for significant cost savings. City staff estimated that on the low-end, cost savings could amount to $12 to 48 million yearly. Other experts have predicted savings in the hundreds of millions due to the increasingly competitive bids the City would receive on its construction tenders.

According to the report from the City Manager, cost savings could result from:

  • Firms that are currently permitted to perform City work competing more aggressively for City work;

  • Firms competing for City work having a broader pool of subcontractors to draw from;

  • Legal cost savings – the City is typically party to 30 grievances annually when a union alleges that a contractor has violated one or more collective agreements which the City is bound by;

  • Firms bound to other unions now being permitted to perform City work, and;

  • Non-union firms also being able to compete for City work.

To quote directly from City staff's supplementary report: "…it is important to understand that the greater the number of collective agreements that the general contractor must comply with and the greater the number of subcontractors the general contractor is required to utilize, the greater the impact such compliance costs may be for the general contractor which the contractor will pass onto the City." (11)

City staff also found that the significant limitations imposed by certain collective agreements have led to lengthy delays in the delivery of municipal ICI projects. For example, some trade unions abide by 4-day or 36-hour work weeks. This restriction can cause major delays as other trades cannot proceed until the work is completed.

The current restrictions have made it very difficult for the City to enter into Public-Private Partnerships (P3s) and other agreements with the private sector. Staff found that the City would gain significant "maneuverability" as a non-construction employer when entering into Section 37 agreements, leases, joint venture, philanthropy, donation, and commercial agreements that result in construction work being performed.

Unfortunately, City Council ultimately decided to support special interest groups at the expense of the Toronto taxpayer. Council's vote disregarded two comprehensive reports from City staff recommending that Toronto opt-in to the Province's Bill 66 to become a non-construction employer open to all union and non-union bidders.

Without any consultation or objective review process, City Council instead voted in favour of an individual Councillor's motion to add a single union to the exclusive list of subcontractors eligible to work on the City's ICI projects.

City Council's decision on the matter was short-sighted and disappointing. The City of Toronto has missed a rare opportunity to achieve significant cost savings, accelerate construction timelines, and encourage innovation. Hamilton and Sault Ste. Marie recently voted to opt-in to Bill 66 - Toronto is now the only municipality in Canada to have a closed-tendering process for ICI projects.

Various news outlets recently reported that a coalition of "open-shop" contractors will be pursuing legal action against the City's decision.

Vote for the City to remain an exclusive, construction employer:

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Apartment Standards: RentSafeTO and Elevator Repairs

With over 30% of Torontonians living in more than 3,500 apartment buildings throughout the City, it's critical that we have a comprehensive plan in place to ensure that building owners comply with the prescribed by-laws and standards.
 
In 2017, City Council approved a brand-new Apartment Building Standards Program called RentSafeTO, which imposes regulations on how building owners operate, maintain the premises, and communicate with tenants. This program applies to buildings that are three storeys or higher, and have ten or more units.
 
Through RentSafeTO, the City's By-law Officers are required to conduct evaluations of buildings every three years and issue a score based on the results of their inspection. Buildings must score at least 50% to pass the inspection and failure to meet this standard results in an in-depth audit of the premises.
 
Property owners who do not comply with the Apartment Building and other applicable by-laws can be issued substantial fines. In addition to general fines, the RentSafeTO program also allows staff to issue continuing and escalating fines for ongoing offences by negligent building owners.
 
You can find more information about RentSafeTO on the City's website, here.
 
While RentSafeTO has provided us with some of the tools necessary to keep our apartment buildings clean, safe, and liveable, there is still more work to be done.

Delayed elevator repairs remain a top-of-mind concern in Ward 15 and throughout the City of Toronto. Currently, the City has no means to enforce the timeline by which an elevator must be returned to service following a mechanical issue. Elevating devices fall under the purview of the Technical Standards & Safety Authority (TSSA) – a Provincially regulated body.
 
Reliable elevator service is critical to keeping our City's apartment buildings accessible for families, seniors, and residents with mobility challenges.
 
At the April 2019 meeting of Planning and Housing Committee, I moved a motion directing staff to study the feasibility of establishing an enforceable timeline for elevator repairs through the RentSafeTO program.

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Opposing Bill 108

On May 2, 2019, the Province tabled Bill 108: More Homes, More Choice Act in the legislature. Bill 108 includes major amendments to the planning processes used to review development applications in the City of Toronto. These changes are incredibly discouraging and, if passed, will have a significant impact on the future of our neighbourhoods.
 
After years of hard work fighting to protect our neighbourhoods and improve the accountability of the planning process for local residents, the proposed changes are extremely disheartening.
 
Over the past eight years, I've moved countless motions to improve the local planning process for residents. As you know, I've been a vocal opponent of the OMB, a quasi-judicial Provincial body that makes the final decision on development applications appealed in Toronto. From the townhouses on Bayview to the high-rises along Eglinton, most of the development applications in Ward 15 have been appealed to and approved by this unelected, unaccountable body.
 
In spring 2017, after significant advocacy from residents across Toronto – including many groups in Ward 15 – the province announced sweeping changes to the development appeal process through Bill 139. This legislation replaced the OMB with the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT), a true appeal body with limited power to overrule municipal decisions, and enacted new policies to give communities a stronger voice in the planning process.

If passed, the new provincial legislation, Bill 108, will walk back many of the neighbourhood-planning based reforms we fought for as a community. Significantly, this includes a return to the former OMB rules and procedures. Instead of reviewing appeals based on the existing, rigorously researched municipal and provincial planning policies, the revised LPAT would be able to issue a decision on a development independent of the municipalities and neighbourhoods affected.

Bill 108 proposes to reinstitute “de novo” hearings, or hearings started anew without reference to the City’s decision on an application. This change will limit the City’s ability to deny development applications and instead will expand the authority of the province to make decisions that impact our local neighbourhoods, without any consultation. The proposed legislation is essentially a reversion to the format of the former OMB hearings under the new LPAT name.
 
Bill 108 also proposes a major reduction in planning decision timelines. The proposed legislation would reduce timelines for consideration of Zoning Bylaw Amendment (ZBA) applications from 150 to 90 days and Official Plan Amendment (OPA) applications from 210 to 120 days. Reducing the time planners have to review applications and report to City Council will ultimately allow applicants the ability to appeal to the more developer-friendly LPAT system much earlier in the process, thereby circumventing the City’s rigorous development review process.
 
Additionally, Bill 108 proposes significant changes to the development charge process. Currently, under Sections 37 and 42 of the Planning Act, developers are required to contribute to neighbourhoods being affected by new development through financial provisions for community benefits such as parks, streetscape improvements, and neighbourhood services. Bill 108 proposes a provincially-determined cap on all parkland and community-related development charges.
 
At the May meeting of City Council, I introduced a series of successful motions:

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While the Province closed the official comment period on June 1, allowing less than a month for the public to respond to Bill 108, the City has requested the Province to provide more time for feedback. The City has also released a comprehensive report detailing the implications of Bill 108. You can access the full report here. In response to my Council motion, an online website and public guide is now available here.
 
I would encourage you to continue to share your thoughts on this concerning legislation with the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing at minister.mah@ontario.ca.

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Along with my colleagues on City Council, I hosted a Planning Town Hall to discuss the impacts that Bill 108 will have on the City's development review process.  There was a fantastic turn-out at the meeting and Chief Planner Gregg Lintern kicked off the evening with a presentation on how the proposed legislation will affect Toronto's neighbourhoods.

Along with my colleagues on City Council, I hosted a Planning Town Hall to discuss the impacts that Bill 108 will have on the City's development review process.

There was a fantastic turn-out at the meeting and Chief Planner Gregg Lintern kicked off the evening with a presentation on how the proposed legislation will affect Toronto's neighbourhoods.

Update on the Province's Bill 108: More Homes, More Choices Act

After years of hard work and advocacy fighting to protect our local neighbourhoods and abolish the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB), I'm extremely disheartened to be writing with an update on the Province's Bill 108: More Homes, More Choice Act, tabled in the legislature late yesterday afternoon.
 
Bill 108 includes major amendments to the planning processes used to review development applications in the City of Toronto. These changes are incredibly discouraging and, if passed, will have a significant impact on the future of our neighbourhoods.
 
Over the past eight years, I've moved countless motions to make our local planning processes more accessible and transparent for residents. As you know, I've been a vocal opponent of the OMB, a quasi-judicial Provincial body that makes the final decision on development applications appealed in Toronto. From the townhouses on Bayview to the towers at Yonge and Eglinton, most of the development applications in Ward 15 have been appealed to and approved by this unelected, unaccountable body.
 
In spring 2017, after significant advocacy from residents across Toronto – including many groups in Ward 15 – the Province announced sweeping changes to the development appeal process through Bill 139. This legislation replaced the OMB with the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT), a true appeal body with limited power to overrule municipal decisions, and enacted new policies to give communities a stronger voice in the planning process.
 
If passed, the new provincial legislation, Bill 108, will walk back many of the reforms we fought for as a community, including:
 
A return to the former OMB rules and procedures. While the LPAT would continue to function as the provincial development appeal body, the Province is proposing changes in line with the former OMB structure. This legislation would reinstitute "de novo" hearings, or hearings started anew without reference to the City's decision on an application. The Bill would also allow parties to introduce new evidence and to call and examine witnesses. The LPAT will issue a decision independent of the municipalities and neighbourhoods affected instead of reviewing appeals in the context of existing municipal plans and provincial planning policies. 
 
This change would reduce the weight of planning decisions made by City Council and expand the authority of provincial LPAT appointees to make decisions that impact our local neighbourhoods, without any consultation. The proposed changes are essentially a reversion back to the format of the former OMB hearings under the new LPAT name.
 
Changes to development charges. Under the current structure, Section 37 of the Planning Act, known as Community Benefits, requires developers to contribute to the neighbourhoods affected by new developments through provisions for community benefits such as park and streetscape improvements.
 
This system has been used to fund community projects and services across Toronto. Bill 108 proposes to make the costs more predictable for developers at the outset of the process by instituting a new authority that would combine and cap all community-related development charges. Parkland Dedication requirements, known as Section 42 funds, and funds to enhance local infrastructure would also be included in the total capped amount. This change would severely limit the City's ability to negotiate community benefits before approving an application.
 
Streamlining development approvals. The proposed planning decision timelines would reduce consideration of Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA) applications from 150 to 90 days, and Official Plan Amendment (OPA) applications from 210 to 120 days.
 
Reducing the time Planners have to review applications and report to City Council will ultimately allow applicants the ability to appeal to the more developer-friendly LPAT system much earlier in the process, thereby circumventing the City's rigorous development review process.
 
Over the coming weeks, I will be working closely with senior staff as we develop the City's formal response to the Province's proposed legislation.
 
If you are interested, I would encourage you to review Bill 108 and the associated Action Plan and share any concerns with your Member of Provincial Parliament.
 
You can submit your comments on Bill 108 through the Environmental Registry of Ontario, here. I've been advised that the Province will only be accepting comments until June 1, 2019, so we must act quickly.
 
As always, please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

Road Safety

Last term, I spearheaded Toronto’s first-ever comprehensive Road Safety Plan as former Chair of the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee. The plan takes a data-based, strategic approach and includes more than 50 countermeasures across multiple emphasis areas – pedestrians, school safety zones, senior safety zones, cyclists, aggressive driving and distraction.

Some of our top priorities are school children and school neighbourhoods, and I’ve been working to accelerate the roll-out of School Safety Zones across the ward. School Safety Zones feature lower speed limits, improved street lighting, leading pedestrian intervals, mid-block crossings, increased enforcement, improved pavement makings, flashing signage, and “Watch Your Speed” driver feedback signs.

This school year, the City is transitioning responsibility for the school crossing guard program from Toronto Police Services (TPS) to the Transportation Services division. Unfortunately, some of our school communities went without regular crossing guard coverage this year due to the number of newly warranted crosswalks and the unexpected volume of guards that retired. With the support of Ward 15 school parents, I moved a motion at City Council requesting that the General Manager, Transportation Services address the issue immediately. My motion resulted in the City hiring two additional contractors to backfill unstaffed crossing guard locations for the remainder of the 2018-2019 school year.

As part of Vision Zero, Ward 15 now has access to 8 of its very own mobile Watch Your Speed driver feedback signs. These signs contain a radar device with an LED display that shows the operating speeds of passing motorists, reminding them to obey the posted speed limit. These signs are installed on a temporary basis at the request of local residents, and have been shown to reduce driver speeds by up to 34%. To request a Watch Your Speed Sign on your street, please call or email my office.

School Visits at City Hall

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Welcoming student groups to City Hall is one of the best parts of my role as a City Councillor – It reminds me of the importance of the work we do every day to build a more vibrant, liveable, and safe City.
 
In February, I welcomed students from Northlea Public School in Leaside who stopped in to the TTC Board Meeting I was chairing to observe local transit planning in action. I was impressed by the great questions and ideas the students shared with me.
 
The City of Toronto offers free educational programs and tours for students of all ages. More information for parents or teachers can be found here.

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Crossing Guards Update

In recent months, I have been contacted by Don Valley West parents regarding the unacceptable gaps in crossing guard coverage in some of our school communities.
 
The City of Toronto is in the process of transitioning responsibility for the school crossing guard program from Toronto Police Services (TPS) to its Transportation Services division. While TPS is responsible for the provision of crossing guards for the 2018-2019 school year, the City has worked with them to contract an independent security service provider for relief coverage when a regular crossing guard is absent from work.

This school year, a number of crosswalks in our neighbourhoods have been without regular guard coverage due to the unexpected number of guards that retired and newly warranted locations.
 
As a result of this, I moved a motion at the December 2018 meeting of City Council requesting that the General Manager, Transportation Services make recommendations to improve and enhance the school crossing guard program. I have since followed this up with two meetings City management requesting immediate attention to the matter and urging staff to use all tools at their disposal to ensure that the City is providing reliable crossing guard coverage.
 
The City responded by pursuing an additional sole-sourced contract to manage demand and fill the remaining crossing guard vacancies in Ward 15. These new crossing guards have now completed police vulnerable sector screening and training and commenced duties on March 4th.
 
The importance of school crossing safety cannot be overstated and I will continue to advocate for students and parents across the ward until this issue is resolved. If you notice an unstaffed crossing guard post, please report it to the City's school crossing guard program by emailingSchoolCrossingGuard@toronto.ca, or call 311.

Crossing Guards

In recent months, I have been contacted by Don Valley West parents regarding the unacceptable gaps in crossing guard coverage in some of our school communities.
 
The City of Toronto is in the process of transitioning responsibility for the school crossing guard program from Toronto Police Services (TPS) to its Transportation Services division. While TPS is responsible for the provision of crossing guards for the 2018-2019 school year, the City has worked with them to contract an independent security service provider for relief coverage when a regular crossing guard is absent from work.

This school year, a number of crosswalks in our neighbourhoods have been without regular guard coverage due to the unexpected number of guards that retired and surplus of newly warranted locations.
 
As a result of this, I moved a motion at the December 2018 meeting of City Council requesting that the General Manager, Transportation Services make recommendations to improve and enhance the school crossing guard program. I have since followed up with two personal letters to the General Manager requesting her immediate attention to the matter and urging staff to use all tools at their disposal to ensure that the City is providing reliable crossing guard coverage.
 
The importance of school crossing safety cannot be overstated and I will continue to advocate for students and parents across the ward until this issue is resolved. If you notice a vacant crossing guard post, please report it to the City's school crossing guard program by emailing SchoolCrossingGuard@toronto.ca, or call 311.

A New Plan to Regulate Construction Dust

Dust from residential construction is not only a major source of disruption, it can also have significant environmental and health impacts on our communities. With input from residents across Don Valley West, I moved a motion in May 2014 directing Toronto Building staff to develop a comprehensive strategy and enforcement plan to regulate the production of construction-related dust.
 
As a result of these efforts, I'm pleased to report that the City's first Dust By-law came into effect on September 4, 2018. Previously, construction dust was completely unregulated in the City of Toronto. Residents who contacted their political representatives were bounced between municipal and provincial offices with no tangible results or enforcement.
 
The new bylaw requires builders to take specific, preventative measures to minimize the generation and distribution of construction dust, including:

  • Wetting the construction material;

  • Using a wet saw or dustless saw technology;

  • Tarping or otherwise containing the source of dust;

  • Installing wind fencing or a fence filter; or

  • Using a vacuum attachment when cutting.

Failure to comply can lead to fines up to $100,000, with special fines where it is determined that the conduct could have resulted in economic advantage for the offender, to the detriment of the surrounding neighbourhood.
 
At the July meeting of City Council, I moved a series of motions to build on and strengthen the newly-established by-law. I directed Toronto Building to unite this strategy with the new residential infill construction strategy, and ensure that notice of the new bylaw is communicated to residents through on-site signage. As you may know, residential construction is regulated and enforced by Toronto Building inspectors. Dust suppression, however, will be enforced by Municipal Licensing & Standards by-law officers. My motion is intended to link the two departments to prevent overlap and encourage efficiency.
 
I also directed City staff to expand the scope of the City's dust regulation efforts by creating a strategy to regulate dust from large-scale construction projects including multi-residential buildings, subdivisions, and mixed-use developments. Finally, I requested a report back on the implementation and enforcement of the new bylaw. I'm expecting a staff report to be presented for consideration at City Council later this year. 

Housing: News from City Council

As most Torontonians will tell you, Toronto is a world class city and a great place to live. As our city continues to grow and attract new residents based on this reputation, it is important that we also take a close look at our housing needs.

At City Council last week, City Staff presented on the Housing Now initiative – a plan to address issues around affordable housing. As we know, Toronto's continued growth will place an increasing pressure on existing affordable housing. This plan, with the support of council, will unlock 11 City-owned properties to create 3,700 new affordable housing units by 2024. City Council approval is the first of many steps in this process, and residents will be consulted as planning on this project continues.

Snow and Ice Removal

Last week's extreme cold and heavy snowfall made for a difficult week for residents of Ward 15. Staff in my office worked hard in the wake of heavy snowfall to respond to concerned residents, many of whom found themselves deeply inconvenienced and even trapped by the record-breaking snowfall. Even with the more temperate weather this past weekend, I was still hearing from concerned residents and directing city staff to plow the remaining issue areas.
 
While I'm thankful for our hard-working Road Operations staff, I share your disappointment with the City's lack of preparedness for January's snowfall. I will be meeting with the Mayor and the General Manager, Transportation Services to discuss how we can improve the City's response to future snow events.  Additionally, I will be following up on a motion I brought to council last April to ask staff to report on recommendations to improve the City's response to extreme weather events in Toronto.
 
You can find more information about snow and ice removal on the City's website, here. For live updates on the City's snow plow progress, please see PlowTO. If you are having difficulty clearing snow and ice or have concerns about a negligent property owner, please contact 311.
 
Please also be reminded that residents responsible for clearing their own properties are required to do so within 12 hours of a snowfall.

Get the new TOwaste App!

Find out what waste items go where, what waste to put out when and where to donate items or find City Drop-off Depots with the new TOwaste App.

Key features include:

The Waste Wizard search tool with information on how to properly dispose of over 2,000 items.

  • Collection schedules for daytime curbside customers.

  • The ability to set reminders for your collection day and opt-in for alerts about service changes.

  • Information about where to find donation locations or City Drop-off Depots.

The TOwaste App is free to download and available for iOS and Android devices. 

Download today!

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TABIA Supports Local Businesses

It was great to see TABIA's Director, John Kiru, and Vice President, Lionel Miskin, at July's Executive Committee meeting to highlight the increasing challenges that small businesses continue to face throughout the City of Toronto.

Vice President Miskin says "It's time to think outside the box" with tax assessments. Thank you to TABIA for your deputation and all the work that you do for Toronto's neighbourhoods and small business owners. 

#ShopLocal

Toronto's Congestion Management Plan

Traffic congestion is a major issue in Ward 25 and across the City of Toronto. According to C.D. Howe, congestion and gridlock could be costing our City up to $11 billion a year in lost productivity. I've repeatedly pushed to advance the Congestion Management Plan (CMP) to better manage gridlock by reducing delays and improving safety through innovations in policy, operations, and technology.
 
Since adopting the CMP in 2013, the City has undertaken several new projects to manage unusual traffic flows due to events, construction, or weather-related road closures. In 2017, the City partnered with the University of Toronto to pilot drones used to monitor diverted traffic during major planned events and adapt traffic signal cycles accordingly. For Ward 25 residents commuting to downtown, City staff are now in the process of designing a comprehensive strategy to facilitate traffic on the Bayview Avenue Extension during closures of the Don Valley Parkway and potential Lower Don River flooding events. 
 
Transportation staff are working to improve traffic signal systems throughout the City. Last year alone, 46 CCTV traffic monitoring cameras were installed, with another 120 planned for 2019 and 2020. Our state-of-the-art Traffic Operations Centre uses these cameras to monitor traffic conditions in real-time and adjust signs and signals. Another 129 detection devices were installed to efficiently operate traffic control signals this year. The City is currently implementing a full Traffic Signal Coordination plan to improve traffic flow and reduce vehicle emissions.
 
The City has made significant strides forward in their collection of big data to inform traffic operations. The City's Big Data Innovation Team incorporates this data in their Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS), which will be used to inform directional signs throughout the City. The Team is also currently working to develop Open Data Portal access to the City's real-time traffic signal control timings.
 
Though City staff are working to implement a number of new projects in addition to those listed above, traffic congestion remains a pressing issue in the City of Toronto. I've moved a number of motions at Community Council to improve traffic flow on our local streets and welcome any feedback or suggestions you may have.

Prioritizing the Downtown Relief Line

I ride the red rocket regularly on my commute to City Hall and observe first-hand the significant reliability and capacity issues on Line 1. I know all-to-well how frustrating overcrowding, sudden stoppages, and unforeseen delays can be for Ward 25-ers travelling to and from the downtown core. During peak hours, riders have to wait for multiple trains to pass by before there even is enough space to board the subway. These issues affect all three major transit stations in Ward 25: York Mills, Lawrence, and Eglinton. 
  
Since 2010, I've consistently advocated for the Downtown Relief Line and continue to believe that it should be City Council's top transit priority. As you may know, the Downtown Relief Line was divided into two separate projects, the Relief Line South (from Pape Station south to Queen Street) and the Relief Line North (from Pape Station north to Eglinton or Sheppard Avenue) in 2017. At Executive Committee, I moved a motion directing staff to accelerate planning of the Relief Line North.  
  
After several recent Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) approvals the population of the Yonge-Eglinton neighbourhood is due to grow exponentially. This influx of new residents will only exacerbate the existing issues on Line 1. As part of the Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan, I created a motion with the Chair of Planning and Growth Management directing City staff to develop short and long-term strategies to ease crowding on Line 1. We also asked staff to report back on the feasibility of delivering the Relief Line North and South as one undertaking to improve transit connectivity across the City.  
  
Like many of you, I am very frustrated by the long delays and mounting costs associated with the Automatic Train Control (ATC) project. At City Council, I directed TTC staff to expedite the implementation of this much-needed technology. In response to the unacceptable delay, I also initiated a comprehensive review of the entire TTC organization focused on creating a more efficient, streamlined internal structure. While this process has been extremely slow, I look forward to the positive benefits of this technology. ATC will control train speed and separation automatically, without human intervention—significantly reducing travel time. When fully implemented, it is estimated that ATC will increase Line 1 capacity by cutting train headways from 2.5 to 2 minutes.  

City Council has approved the alignment and station locations for the Relief Line South.

City Council has approved the alignment and station locations for the Relief Line South.

City staff are currently studying the alignment and potential station locations for the Relief Line North.

City staff are currently studying the alignment and potential station locations for the Relief Line North.

Toronto's New 25 Ward Boundaries

Provincial Bill 5
 
On August 14, 2018, the Government of Ontario passed legislation that reduces the number of City of Toronto wards from 47 to 25, aligning with current federal and provincial electoral ridings.
 
The October 22 Municipal Election will be conducted based on the new 25 ward model.

How is Ward 25 Changing?
 
Ward 25 will now be a part of Ward 15.
 
I have attached two maps below to highlight the changes between the Ward 25 boundaries and the new Ward 15 boundaries.

The current Ward 25 boundaries that will no longer be in place following the October 22 Municipal Election.

The current Ward 25 boundaries that will no longer be in place following the October 22 Municipal Election.

The new Ward 15 boundaries that will be inclusive of the old Ward 25. All new changes will be in place for the October 22, 2018 Municipal Election.

The new Ward 15 boundaries that will be inclusive of the old Ward 25. All new changes will be in place for the October 22, 2018 Municipal Election.

As you can see, the majority of the old Ward 25 will fit into the new Ward 15 boundaries, exclusive of the boundary line moving west from Don Mills Road to Leslie Street.

The new Ward 15 - Don Valley West will be roughly double the size of the original Ward 25, increasing from 58,000 to over 100,000 residents. Ward 15 will include the majority of the current Ward 25, the current Ward 26, and a large piece of the old Ward 22 east of Mount Pleasant Road.
 
To help residents and businesses find their new ward, the City has created the MyVote app which provides Torontonians information about City Council wards based on their home address, including the candidates that will be running in that ward in the 2018 Municipal Election.
 
A complete List of Candidates is also available and is updated in real-time.

Toronto's Ward Boundaries are Changing

Ward 25 is going to be Ward 27


Toronto Moves from 44 to 47 Electoral Wards for 2018 Municipal Election


A Boundary Review of Toronto's Municipal Wards was conducted from 2014-2016 to review the City's population.
 
When debated at City Council in 2016, I voted against increasing the size of City Council from 44 to 47 wards – as I strongly believe that the number of wards should not increase, but rather, that the ward boundaries should be modified to align with existing provincial or federal boundaries.
 
The City of Toronto’s 2018 municipal election, however, will use the new ward boundaries model for Toronto, increasing the number of wards from 44 to 47.
 
The new ward boundaries will come into effect for the upcoming 2018 municipal election and new Council term.

How is Ward 25 Changing?

Ward 25 will now be Ward 27.
 
Ward 27 will cover 98% of the area formerly known as Ward 25. These changes, however, will move the ward boundary line west from Don Mills Road to Leslie Street and south from Broadway Avenue to Eglinton Avenue East. I have attached several maps below to better illustrate this change. 
 
To help residents and businesses find their new ward, the City has created the MyVote app which provides Torontonians information about City Council wards based on their home address, including the candidates that will be running in that ward in the 2018 municipal election.

Comparing Toronto's 47 and 44 Ward Boundaries

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The yellow portion on the eastern side of the ward is the area that is currently within Ward 25 but will no longer fall within Ward 27's new boundaries.

The smaller orange portion at the bottom of Ward 27 is the new area that Ward 27 will be gaining, not previously included in Ward 25's current boundaries.

New Ward 27 Boundaries

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