Ward 25 Community Safety Meeting

I would like to invite you to a community meeting that will be held at the Lawrence Park Community Church (2180 Bayview Avenue) on February 20th, from 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM for all of Ward 25 residents.

Over the past few weeks, several residents have contacted me about crime and safety in Ward 25. In response to these concerns, I reached out to the Chief of Police, Mark Saunders, and asked him to attend this event. Chief Saunders will be accompanied by the Superintendents of Divisions 32, 33, and 53—the three police divisions in Ward 25. This meeting is a rare and important opportunity to voice your concerns directly to top officials at Toronto Police Services and learn more about local policing initiatives.

Please share this information with your neighbours and any members of the community.

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Community Consultation Meeting - 4155 Yonge Street

City Planning is hosting a community consultation meeting to discuss the proposed development at 4155 Yonge Street.

About the Proposal

Goldberg Group is proposing a 14-storey residential building on the western portion of the subject site, constructed over the existing TTC subway tunnel. You can find out more about this application here.

City Planning presented a Preliminary Report at the January meeting of North York Community Council (NYCC). I moved a motion to extend the notice area for the meeting. You can read the complete recommendations here.

Contact Information

Valeria Maurizio, City Planner

416-395-7052

Valeria.Maurizio@toronto.ca

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RESIDENTIAL INFILL CONSTRUCTION

Based on feedback I have received from residents, I moved several motions directing the City to improve its response to residential infill construction sites and ensure that our neighbourhoods are protected and respected when undergoing development.

City staff have developed a multi-faceted strategy to minimize the negative impacts of residential infill construction and streamline how the City deals with contested development. You can read the Staff Report developed in response to my motions to minimize the negative impacts residential infill here. A final report from Building Toronto is expected to be presented to the Planning and Growth Management Committee in the first quarter of this year.

As part of this strategy, Toronto Building has developed the Good Neighbour Guide for Residential Infill. This can be found on the City's Toronto Building website, which includes information on how the City responds to and addresses complaints about infill development.

If you have concerns about residential infill in your neighbourhood, you can now request a building inspection online. Building Toronto has also developed a new website where residents can check the status of building permits as well as any work order issues, you can visit the site here. For more information on the City's Residential Infill Development Strategy, please visit www.toronto.ca/infill.

It is important to note, that the Province of Ontario's Building Code Act does not enforce a standardized timeline or deadlines to ensure the timely construction of residential construction projects. Unfortunately, until this is addressed, the City's powers are limited.

RECYCLING RIGHT

Help curb contamination in Toronto's Blue Bin recycling program. 

Contamination in Toronto's Blue Bins has significantly increased in recent years. When Blue Bins are contaminated with too many non-recyclable items, the recyclable materials cannot be sorted adequately – resulting in recyclable items being sent to landfill. 
 
Contaminated recycling not only impacts our environment negatively by increasing the strain on our landfills, but it also costs the City millions annually. Just last year, more than 52,000 tonnes of non-recyclable material was incorrectly put in Blue Bins. In order to achieve our goal of a 70% waste diversion rate by 2026, we need to do better.
 
Solid Waste Management Services (SWMS) is using a progressive approach to reduce contamination. Blue Bins are being inspected prior to pick-up, with bins that are contaminated being tagged and left behind on collection day. Notices indicating why the bin was not collected are left with the contaminated garbage, requesting residents to remove the contamination before the next recycling collection day.
 
While it is still early in the program, the City has seen positive results in the reduction of contamination following the implementation of Blue Bin inspections.

Know before you throw!

Food and organic waste such as food scraps and containers with leftover food have been top Blue Bin contamination offenders. Old clothing and textiles also do not belong in the Blue Bin. Instead, donate or bring items to my Environment Day this summer! Another common mistake is recycling hot beverage cups in the blue bin, these are lined with plastic or wax that cannot be recycled. However, non-black plastic lids and paper sleeves should be placed in the Blue Bin.
 
You can help improve the City's waste diversion by learning which bins your waste goes into. Ask the Waste Wizard to find out where and how to properly dispose of any specific item.
 
The City of Toronto's Solid Waste Management Services 2018 calendar is packed with information and tips on how to reduce, reuse and dispose of your waste properly, and includes a "Put Waste in its Place" Poster to help you figure out what goes in the Blue Bin, Green Bin, Garbage Bin and more!

Know before you throw!

Know before you throw!

Municipal Stewardship of the Great Lakes

In December, I was honoured to welcome mayors and municipal leaders from across Canada and the U.S. to Toronto for the mid-year meeting of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative (GLSCI). The GLSCI is a binational coalition of 131 mayors from Ontario, Quebec, and the eight American Great Lakes states who advocate for the protection and restoration of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. The Great Lakes are a critical and irreplaceable resource, and I was inspired by the GLSCI's commitment to their continued protection.
 
The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River contain approximately 20% of the world's freshwater supply and provide drinking water for over 40 million people. The impacts of the Lakes are so broad that it is necessary to collaborate across national and regional boundaries to ensure their protection. The GLSCI's notable initiatives include efforts to ban the production and distribution of products containing microbeads, mitigate the impacts of climate change and greenhouse gas emissions, incorporate innovative technology in conservation strategies, and manage invasive species such as zebra mussels and Asian carp.
 
In Toronto, we are undertaking various initiatives of our own to protect the Great Lakes water system. For example, a 25-year, multibillion dollar infrastructure project is currently underway to reduce combined sewer overflow (CSO) in the Don River as a part of the City's Wet Weather Flow Master Plan. Most combined sewers were constructed as long as a century ago, and utilize one pipe to carry both sewage and stormwater. Usually this combined water is diverted to wastewater treatment plants, however, during periods of intense rainfall, the volume of water may exceed the system's capacity. In this circumstance, untreated sewage and garbage water will be deposited, untreated, into creeks, rivers, and Lake Ontario. This process can pollute our freshwater lakes with bacteria, pathogens, heavy metals, oils, pesticides, and nutrients which can cause undesired algae growth. The City is currently in Stage One of a five-stage program that aims to virtually eliminate CSO. This project serves as an example of how activities under the purview of individual municipalities can have a massive impact on a shared resource, the Great Lakes.

I am committed to advancing Toronto's legacy of leadership in freshwater conservation initiatives. In order to do so, we must continue to collaborate with municipalities across the continent through avenues such as the GLSCI. Stewardship of this invaluable freshwater resource is our collective responsibility.

As Chair of Public Works, I was honoured to welcome mayors & local leaders from across the continent to discuss the protection and restoration of the Great Lakes.

As Chair of Public Works, I was honoured to welcome mayors & local leaders from across the continent to discuss the protection and restoration of the Great Lakes.

Smart-er Congestion Management in Ward 25

Ten intersections on Yonge Street between York Mills Road and Eglinton Avenue will be outfitted with new, "smart signal" technology in 2018. Transportation Services is aiming for the system to become fully operational in the Spring. As Chair of Transportation, I launched this initiative in November at the very first installation site at Yonge Street and Yonge Boulevard in Ward 25.
 
These new smart signals will replace the 25-year old signal technology used across the City of Toronto. Our current traffic light technology employs fixed signal timing plans to accommodate predicted volumes of traffic, while the new smart signals will automatically monitor traffic flow and adjust signal cycles without human intervention. Smart signals can automatically make large-scale adaptations in response to unusual traffic conditions caused by weather, events, or accidents. They can also synchronize automatically and will be able to re-assign "green-time" over large stretches of Yonge Street to accommodate a high volume of vehicles travelling in the same direction.
 
The success of this project will be assessed based on the reduction of overall delay for travellers across the connected network of signalized intersections on Yonge Street. Transportation staff hope that the signals will also limit driver frustration caused by waiting at a red signal when there are no vehicles travelling in the other direction. Staff have undertaken significant preparatory data collection and will be comparing vehicle delay, stops, and travel time before and after the network is installed.
 
I am hopeful that this technology will help to alleviate some of the pressures of irregular congestion on Ward 25's busiest roadways.

As Chair of Transportation, I was happy to launch Toronto's first smart traffic signals in Ward 25 on Yonge Street.

As Chair of Transportation, I was happy to launch Toronto's first smart traffic signals in Ward 25 on Yonge Street.

Midtown in Focus - Public Open House

The proposed Yonge-Eglinton Secondary Plan will set in place a road map for Midtown's evolution over the next 25 years. The Plan provides detailed direction for the physical development of Midtown and sets priorities for investing in and sustaining a complete, liveable
community.

The Plan is supported by infrastructure assessments focused on parks and public realm, transportation, community services and facilities, and water – together they will ensure that infrastructure capacity keeps pace with development and supports quality of life for all
Midtown stakeholders.

 

This open house is your opportunity to see how the proposed Secondary Plan and infrastructure assessments will shape the future of Midtown. Please drop by to learn
more about the plan, attend workshops and share your thoughts!

For more information, please contact:
Paul Farish, Senior Planner
City Planning Division
416-392-3529
Paul.Farish@toronto.ca
www.toronto.ca/planning/yongeeglinton

Visit the Midtown in Focus website to read the proposed Secondary Plan and take the online survey (starting February 10, 2018).

Have an innovative idea to reduce waste in your community?

Grants of up to $25,000 are available to support innovative community-based efforts to reduce residential waste and increase participation in Toronto's waste diversion programs. Priority for funding will be given to projects that reduce waste in apartments and condos. Examples of projects that could be eligible include waste education and engagement programs and initiatives that align with Toronto's Long Term Waste Management Strategy, such as the repair, exchange, swapping and sharing of goods. Applications close February 23, 2018. For more information and to submit an Expression of Interest visit http://bit.ly/2pQHNew

School Safety Zones

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At the beginning of this term, I spearheaded the development of Toronto’s first-ever comprehensive and city-wide Road Safety Plan. The City has now embarked on a five year commitment to make real changes to our roads to make them safer for everyone.

On the first day of school, I unveiled the City’s latest measure to improve road safety – our School Safety Zones. By the end of the year, we will have 22 School Safety Zones in place, with another 20 in 2018 and each year after that.

The School Safety Zones feature:

  • New school zone safety signs with flashing beacons
  • School zone pavement markings
  • “Watch Your Speed” driver feedback signs
  • Zebra markings at school crosswalks

Staff are also extending the coverage of enhanced pavement markings up to 250m away from schools in support of active and safe routes to school.

The prioritization of school zones are based on consultation with the Toronto District and Toronto Catholic District School Boards, local Councillors and the police and takes into consideration the number of collisions in the area and the area’s walkability index. The list of schools will be provided to the Toronto Police Services in order to increase enforcement.

As you know, we are now in the Fall season when the days are shorter and it gets darker earlier. Unfortunately, this is also the time of the year when collisions increase. For this reason, since approval of the Toronto’s Road Safety Plan, we’ve also:

  • Accelerated the implementation of the Pedestrian Safety Corridor program. By the end of the year, there will be 46 of these corridors which include a variety of measures to reduce safety risks for pedestrians.
  • Rolled out Senior Safety Zones, which include increased walk times at traffic signals, improved pedestrian markings and better signage.

To stay up to date, check out our website toronto.ca/VisionZeroTO.

Protect your Pipes!

Be prepared!

Protect your pipes from freezing.

 

Frozen pipes can leave you without water or cause your pipes to burst, leading to expensive property damage. If your pipes are prone to freezing, you may wish to contact a plumber for advice. Here are some tips to help protect your home:

  • Know where to find your main water shut-off valve (in case your pipes burst).

  • Insulate pipes most prone to freezing, especially near outside walls and in crawl spaces, the attic and garage.

  • Seal air leaks in areas where pipes are located. Check around windows and doors, electrical wiring, dryer vents and pipes.

  • Drain and shut the outdoor water supply as outdoor faucets are the first to freeze.

  • Keep areas that contain indoor pipes above 8°C, especially near the water meter.

  • In extreme cold weather, you can choose to run a pencil thin stream of water to keep water moving. However, you will be charged for the water used if you choose this step.

For more information, visit toronto.ca/frozenpipes.